2016 Olympics Tennis Live Stream: Watch Online without Cable

Olympics Tennis Book Cover Olympics Tennis
2016 Rio Olympic Games

The Rio 2016 Olympic Games are underway at last, and Olympics Tennis is set to keep tennis fans worldwide on the edge of their seats all August! Want to watch Olympics Tennis online?

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Sling TV button United States Only

International Only (UK, Australia, Canada, etc.)

The Olympics tennis tournaments are an exciting opportunity for tennis players to compete for their countries instead of the normal routine of competing for themselves. While it is still an individual medal, the ability to win the medal for your country makes the experience that much more incredible. The best tennis players in the world will all be down in Rio and will certainly put on some incredibly exciting performances. If you’d like to catch an Olympics Tennis live stream, but you don’t have cable TV, keep reading to learn how.

The Tennis matches will be broadcast on Bravo during the Olympics. Even though Bravo is a cable channel, it can still easily be watched without cable through services like Sling TV and PlayStation Vue. The below guide gives all the highlights and information you need to watch Olympics tennis online on either service.


Watch Olympics Tennis Online on Sling TV

sling tv

Sling TV will be a great way to get an Olympics tennis live stream and its starting package only costs $25 per month. For the $25, you get streaming access to more than 40 popular cable channels on its Sling Blue package. Bravo, the channel that will be broadcasting 94.5 hours of live Olympics tennis, is included in Sling Blue.

Sling TV will not only be a way to watch Olympics tennis online, but a key way to watch tons of other events as well on NBCSN and USA. You can also get more coverage of the Olympics through Sling TV’s add-on package, which you can learn more about in our review. If you are interested in watching Olympics tennis streaming free, you can do so for a week during the Olympics with a 7-day free trial.

Also, if you want to commit to a little longer on Sling TV, we recommend looking into the ongoing deals for a three-month subscription. In return, you can usually get great discounts on either Roku players or an Apple TV. Check out the ongoing Apple TV deals and Roku offers (currently a FREE Roku 2!) on the Sling TV site.


Subscribe to PlayStation Vue to get a Olympics Tennis Live Stream

Playstation Vue

PlayStation Vue also includes Bravo in its basic package, so you can stream Olympics tennis with the service for only $30 per month. NBCSN, USA, MSNBC, and CNBC will all be other channels to watch other Olympic events on and ESPN, ESPN2, TBS, TNT, and FS1 are just some of the other channels included in the package. In total, there are fifty channels and you can learn more about the packages in our review of the service.

The one thing to note on PlayStation Vue is you really cannot stream much if you are not inside your home. There are currently restrictions that might make it a pain to watch the Olympics, since so many events are happening throughout the day.


Even if you are not in the U.S. You can Watch Olympics Tennis Online

While these options above are not available to those in other countries, there are still options out there. This is thanks to the huge global trend of cable cutting as more and more people prefer to watch their favorite TV shows and sporting events online. If you are interested in watching outside of the U.S., you can learn more here.


With tennis legend Roger Federer injured and set to miss the Olympic Games, there is some room for up-and-coming players to shine. Team USA Tennis is looking quite strong, as well, with many fans and analysts expecting Gold in their immediate future.

The entire Olympics will be broadcast on NBC networks, which means you can watch nearly the entire thing without cable. Check out our Olympics streaming guide to learn more about all your options.





Matt Pelletier

Matt Pelletier

Matt Pelletier has a background in finance and information technology and has written for publications with themes ranging from sports to enterprise technology and investments.
Matt Pelletier